Training

Summer Cooling Tips From A New England Runner

One coach dishes up more tips to stay chill in summer heat.

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Certified coach and personal trainer Kristen Hislop, 50, is no stranger to running in the heat. In fact, the Ironman finisher and multiple marathoner has learned so much during her own hot-temperature training during steamy summers in Clifton Park, N.Y., she makes a point to include weather tips in her work with clients. Check out her top ways you can beat the heat!

Heat Rehearsal
Giving your body time to acclimate to hotter temperatures is crucial for enjoying steamy weather. Early in the season, you’ll find the hot runs are super hard, but over time they get easier. Before a summer race, try to get out in race conditions as often as possible. It can take around two weeks for your body to adjust to warmer temperatures.

Towel Time
When your body starts to heat up, blood flows to the surface to help dissipate the heat. Placing cold towels on your neck and wrists, two places where your veins are closer to your skin, can help keep you feeling comfortable. Just be careful to choose cold rather than icy, since ice can cause vasodilation, which makes it harder for your body to cool itself.

Head Gear
Wearing a hat keeps the sun off your face, lessening your exposure to the heat. Choose a style that’s made of wicking material for ultimate cooling power. And for really hot races, dunk your hat in cold water at an aide station for immediate relief.

Cold Feet
It’s easy to forget the importance of keeping feet as cool as possible. Your feet need to breathe so that the heat is released away from your body. Though some might think wool is only for cold weather, merino wool is a super breathable material that wicks sweat away.

Cool Core
In hot weather, it is critical to keep your core temperature down. One way to do that is by drinking icy beverages. If you’re a hot coffee or tea drinker, try sipping iced coffee or tea instead. A lower core temperature results in reduced relative oxygen consumption, meaning you’ll be able to run longer.