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The Rain Gear Included in Our Favorite Rainy Day Runfit

Whether you live where it rains year-round or are preparing for one rainy season, we all know the difference good rain gear can make in wet weather.

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Getting soaked while running can be a bummer. But there’s no need to sing ‘rain, rain, go away,’ when you’ve got top-notch rain gear to get you out the door. With spring showers headed our way, we pulled together our favorite rainy day running outfit that will be by our side through the season.  

Janji Rainrunner Pack Jacket | $198

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A good jacket is perhaps the most important piece of rain gear a runner can have. What do we love most about this rain jacket from Janji? The mid-section ventilation. It allows heat to escape without letting rain in. And of course, the ultra lightweight water and windproof fabric is exactly what you need on a rainy spring run. If the weather clears up mid-way through the run, just pack the jacket into its stow-away pocket and you’re on your way once again.  

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Tracksmith Thaw Long Sleeve | $118

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The wool long sleeve run top from Tracksmith is as fine and lightweight as wool can be, making it perfect for the transition season of spring running. For mornings that start off cold, and when running without an extra layer is not an option, wool is perfect as an absorbent layer for warmth, and can be easily layered under a rain jacket if the weather demands. This long sleeve is so light, it can easily be slipped off and tied around the waist if the temperature demands and you won’t notice it’s there.

On Running Pants | $170

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These running pants can just about do it all. Except for the warmest days when you really need a breeze, these joggers hold up in heavy rain, cold, and even moderate spring days, with ventilation to let out that trapped heat. The moisture-wicking fabric is comfortable, breathable, and moves with you. And yes, it has pockets.

Ciele Gocap | $40

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When it’s truly pouring out a good hat is necessary for keeping your sight clear from water showering down your face. This lightweight cap is perfect for running and the UPF 40 rating makes it great to wear rain or shine, a must-add to your rain gear list.   

Asics Cumulus 23 GTX | $130

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The Cumulus GTX is the everyday training shoe dialed up for winter and wet running conditions through its collaboration with Gore-Tex. It’s a cushioned, high-mileage trainer that is ready for the road in wind, rain, or shine. See our review of Gore-Tex road and trail running shoes for more wet weather options. 

RELATED: What Runners Should Know About Getting Caught in the Rain

Flite XT Trail Five Socks | $27

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These socks, part a new release from Swiftwick, are our go-tos for spring adventures. The wool blend helps to wick moisture, whether sweat or rain, away from your feet, and the grippy soles help to keep your foot stable in your shoe even during downpours. We’ve worn them for many wet, blister-free miles already this season.

Spibelt Performance Series | $41

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If you’re not going to spend the cash on a good pair of waterproof running pants or jacket (though it is probably worth it), you’ll at least want a waterproof running belt to keep your valuables dry. We like how low profile this running belt is with very little room to let elements in. Plus, it is made with a water resistant material that keeps your phone free from both water and sweat.

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