Strava’s user data shows that January 17 is “Quitter’s Day,” the date athletes are most likely to forfeit their New Year’s resolutions.

If you are among the many who set resolutions for 2019 on January 1, beware: according to Strava’s user data, today is “Quitter’s Day.” This prediction is based on an algorithm Strava uses to assess its users’ activity habits and trends, which enables the app to predict the date on which athletes are most likely to let their fitness commitments slide. This year’s data harnessed information from more than 108 million activities in the United States and almost 685 million activities worldwide.

The announcement isn’t all doom and gloom, however—in addition to revealing this data, Strava also shared strategies athletes found successful while sticking to their goals in 2018, four of which are highlighted below.

Establish A Goal

The Data

Strava’s 2018 Year in Sport report, which analyzed data collected from 36 million athletes in 195 countries, showed that 88 percent of runners who set mileage goals were still successfully pursuing them six months later, while 79 percent of runners who set time-related goals did the same.

Try It

Set a goal for reaching a new PR, either in training or racing. Circle July 17 on your calendar and check back in with yourself at that time to review your progress.

Find A Buddy

The Data

Runners who recorded their workouts on Strava were found to work out more often (and for longer periods of time) while logging miles with others. While solo runners ran an average of 4.8 miles per workout, those who ran with others earned a slightly higher average of 6 miles per workout.

Try It

Run with a buddy after work or on weekends—or join one of your community’s local running clubs.

Try Something New

The Data

Athletes who sprinkled variety into their workout schedules were found to be more than twice as active last year as those who picked a single sport and stuck to it.

Try It

Go for a hike, take a dip in the pool at your local community recreation center, log a few miles on your bike each week or start cross-training. Each of these alternate activities can improve your endurance (read: help you run better) and will encourage you to enjoy the outdoors in new ways.

Head Indoors

The Data

Poor weather conditions and busy schedules limit many athletes’ abilities to stick to their fitness goals—especially in the wintertime when there are also fewer daylight hours to work with. Strava’s 2018 report showed that weekdays were most popular among athletes for indoor workouts (especially Tuesdays), but we’re willing to bet your local gym is open every day of the week.

Try It

Don’t like the thought of hopping on the “dreadmill”? We advise trying our collection of treadmill workouts for a new challenge. (You can also check out our Treadmill Survival Playlist to help pass the time.)