If your running buddy often leaves you in their dust, our etiquette expert has some advice on how the handle the situation.

speedy running buddy

Etiquette expert Lizzie Post, great-great-granddaughter of Emily Post, knows a thing or two about the rules of the road—and the descendant of the famous decorum diva is a runner too! 

Q: I went trail running with my friend last weekend. I thought we would run together, but she ended up speeding up and leaving me in the dust to navigate my way back. I was so upset, I didn’t say anything at the time. What’s the best way to bring this up?

This is one of those tough times when it’s really important to communicate to your friend what this experience was like from your perspective. Since you chose not to address this when you both returned to the car, I suggest you bring it up the next time you agree to run together.

“Jenna, I’d love to go on another trail run, but I either need you to stick with my pace, or we need to invite someone else who will. I didn’t feel comfortable navigating the trail back alone last time.”

Don’t feel like you have to amp up the emotion to convey this message. In fact using a sincere but calm tone when you speak with her will probably be most effective. She’ll hear you, but she’ll be less likely to respond defensively.

Have a question for Lizzie? Email editorial@womensrunning.com or tweet @womensrunning with the hashtag #ProperForm.

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