The latest in health and wellness research that can affect your running.

 

hot tips june 2015

Under The Influence
What’s the best way to encourage your spouse to work out? Maintain your own sweat schedule. Research shows that an inactive partner is 70 percent more likely to become active within six years if his or her other half keeps the fitness going. We call it passive peer pressure!

Related: How To Train With A Loved One And Not Go Crazy

Pay The Price
Researchers at the University of California Santa Barbara found that people are 20 percent more likely to work out if they are forced to relinquish a small fee to skip the gym. If you need an extra nudge to get out the door, consider signing up for an app like Stickk (free, stickk.com), which “punishes” you by donating a few of your dollars to a charity of choice every time you choose loafing over running.

Feed Your Mind
A balanced diet doesn’t just do a body good—it helps your brain stay fit too. A report published in The Lancet medical journal studied two groups of older adults (ages 60 to 77), one of which followed a healthy eating and exercise program. The group that adhered to the regimen performed 25 percent better at the end of two years on tests measuring cognitive ability. We can’t think of a better reason to enjoy those greens.

Related: 3 Awesome Fresh Salad Recipes

Mane For Miles Means Miles For Mane
Running might leave you with snarled locks and a sweaty scalp, but in the long-term, exercise is good for your hair. Increased blood flow and stress relief—both positive effects of a solid run—have been shown to encourage hair growth and follicle health. Whip that pony back and forth!